London’s Alleys and Passages - Archive Articles

London’s Alleys: Hogarth Court, EC3
London’s Alleys: Hogarth Court, EC3

This is a wide and tall alley that passes through a modern building, and while the alley looks new, it follows a path that’s nearly 600 years old.

London’s Alleys: South Molton Passage, W1
London’s Alleys: South Molton Passage, W1

This is a short little passageway between a couple of the posh shops that line a similarly named lane just off Bond Street.

London’s Alleys: Garden Walk, EC2
London’s Alleys: Garden Walk, EC2

This is a mix of a narrow passage opening into a wide road in Shoreditch which was recently partially paved with the smallest garden to walk past you’ve probably seen.

London’s Alleys: Banbury Court, WC2
London’s Alleys: Banbury Court, WC2

This is a recently cleaned up alley that links two busy shopping streets in Covent Garden.

London’s Alleys: Compter Passage, EC2
London’s Alleys: Compter Passage, EC2

This is an entirely new alley for London, but owes some of its existence to a Tudor prison and a Victorian charity.

London’s Alleys: Shrewsbury Court, EC1
London’s Alleys: Shrewsbury Court, EC1

This is a very short covered alley that leads from a busy market street into a post-war clearance park near the Barbican.

London’s Alleys: Cromwell Mews, SW7
London’s Alleys: Cromwell Mews, SW7

This is another of the posh mews that were once shabby stables, and it can be found just around the corner from South Kensington tube station.

London’s Alleys: Angel Court, EC2
London’s Alleys: Angel Court, EC2

This alley just behind the Bank of England starts off with a narrow covered entrance but opens up to a wide passageway.

London’s Alleys: South Yard, EC2
London’s Alleys: South Yard, EC2

This charming cobbled* and sloped passageway looks like it’s been here for centuries, but in fact, may be barely 30 years old.

London’s Alleys: Sun Court, EC2
London’s Alleys: Sun Court, EC2

A covered alley running off Cornhill in the city that was once the home to the King’s official weights.

London’s Alleys: Rolls Passage, EC4
London’s Alleys: Rolls Passage, EC4

This alley off Chancery Lane is a mix of Victorian and 1990s offices, and a modern pub curving around a large office block.

London’s Alleys: Doughty Mews, WC1
London’s Alleys: Doughty Mews, WC1

A charming mews running riot with plants and old former housing for horses and servants just around the corner from the Charles Dickens Museum.

London’s Alleys: Swallow Passage, W1
London’s Alleys: Swallow Passage, W1

This is a narrow alley right next to Oxford Circus that is soon to vanish, replaced by a new property development.

London’s Alleys: Barbon Close, WC1
London’s Alleys: Barbon Close, WC1

This is covered passage next to a beautifully restored Georgian house opposite Great Ormond Street hospital.

London’s Alleys: Adam’s Court, EC2
London’s Alleys: Adam’s Court, EC2

This is a surprisingly large open space right in the heart of the City that you would only discover by passing through covered arches.

London’s Alleys: Wilder Walk, W1
London’s Alleys: Wilder Walk, W1

This is a new alley next to Piccadilly Circus caused by a recent redevelopment of the Regent Palace Hotel, and it’s not a restoration of an old alley, it’s entirely new.

London’s Alleys: Peto Place, NW1
London’s Alleys: Peto Place, NW1

This is a private looking cobbled* passage leading behind the grand frontages of the Regents Park buildings. The passage itself isn’t that notable, posh, clean and functional, but the buildings though, they tell a story.

London’s Alleys: Primrose Hill, EC4
London’s Alleys: Primrose Hill, EC4

This alley is a lingering remnant of a much longer passage that used to run all the way up to Fleet Street.

London’s Alleys: Brabant Court, EC3
London’s Alleys: Brabant Court, EC3

This is a chaming litle cobbled courtyard next to the Walkie Talkie skyscraper, that contains one of the few surviving  Georgian buildings in the City of London.

London’s Alleys: Pinner’s Passage, EC2
London’s Alleys: Pinner’s Passage, EC2

This is a very modern looking, and very modern existing alley that can be found opposite the former NatWest Tower, now Tower 42.

London’s Alleys: Great St Thomas Apostle, EC4
London’s Alleys: Great St Thomas Apostle, EC4

A narrow lane near Cannon Street that’s the site of a church destroyed in the Great Fire of London.

London’s Alleys: Pied Bull Yard, WC1
London’s Alleys: Pied Bull Yard, WC1

This concealed yard next to the British Museum looks as if it’s been here for centuries, but in fact, Pied Bull Yard is barely 40 years old, or if you prefer, several hundred years old.

Faulkner’s Alley, EC1 – London’s Alleys and Passages
Faulkner’s Alley, EC1 – London’s Alleys and Passages

This is an alley that many people pass walking to and from Farringdon station with an alluringly ornate ironwork grill and gate.

London’s Alleys: Alderman’s Walk, EC2
London’s Alleys: Alderman’s Walk, EC2

This is an alley close to Liverpool Street station, and can be found next to St Botolph’s without Bishopsgate church, and while dating to roughly when the church was built, its notable history only starts in the 17th century.