A new ticket office building has opened at Kidbrooke station in southeast London, replacing a small brick building that used to be on the site.

Planning application concept image

The station has seen quite a lot of change in recent years. The original station buildings were replaced with more modern structures in the 1970s. In 2014 an interim station building was opened as part of the regeneration of the Ferrier Estate, before being replaced by the new station building.

As part of the Kidbrooke Masterplan, approved in 2008 to redevelop a large housing estate to the south of the station, it was agreed that Berkely Homes would rebuild and slightly relocate the station.

The station was going to be a green wall clad cube, but the plans were later changed to a simpler triangular shaped building with brick cladding. A smaller cube on top contains the station name and clock, and has a slightly 1970s appearance to it.

(c) Southeastern

One major change that wasn’t included in the plans was to improve step-free access over to the other platform. Although it’s only a short walk up to a main road to get to the other side, that the bus stops are also on the nothern side of the station makes step-free access from the southern side ticket office more of a priority.

The planned ticket barriers have also not been included in the design after the planning application was later amended to remove them.

(c) Southeastern

Delivery of the new station at Kidbrooke was a collaboration between Berkeley, Network Rail and Southeastern.

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One comment
  1. Simon says:

    How come no barriers? I thought they were virtually compulsory these days.

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