Delicious Decay: The Edible Body Farm (Evening)

This event has finished Took place on: Friday, 28th Oct 2016

Delicious Decay will engage the public with the sometimes horrifying yet fascinating topic of bodily decomposition via very palatable means, and will be held during the run-up to Halloween on October 28th and 29th.
The event is inspired in part by the unusual chemical indole, which is present in coffee and chocolate as well as the decomposing deceased.

This opening evening on Friday 28th October will include three mini lectures (15 minutes), chances to view the specimens, information about the full Saturday event and free 'death' cocktail. Talks from 19:00:

Carla Valentine – “Mourning Coffee: How funerary cannibalism led to death cakes, death cookies, and funeral biscuits”
Dr Anna Williams – “Nauseating or Necessary? Why we need Body Farms in the UK”

Jamie Upton – “What’s Your Poison?: Cocktails of Death”
Doors open 18:30 for your free cocktail and chance to view the specimens, the event starts at 19:00 and the talks end around 20:00 with half an hour or so to view the specimens again. Evening ends 20:45 latest. 

Delicious Decay: Digging into Baking and Decomposition

Sherbet ‘cremains’, skeleton shortbread and the scent of death all feature in a festival focusing on bodily decay at Barts Pathology Museum, part of Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Opening evening on Friday 28 October will include talks on body farms and how funerary cannibalism relates to cakes, while themed cocktails will also be available. Throughout the Saturday event there will be goods to purchase and decomposition ‘experiences’ included in the ticket, such as digging through edible soil to excavate consumable body parts made by bakers/food artists and smelling the chemicals currently used to train cadaver dogs. There will also be mini lectures to educate on what each of the unusual consumables represents and how they relate to decomposition.

Carla Valentine, Technical Curator at Barts Pathology Museum, said: “In our modern society the general public rarely interact with reminders of mortality, instead using images of decomposition as symbols of fear, frequently in the form of the ‘zombie’. Alongside this there is also an increased interest in the forensics of human decay as it pertains to body farms (Taphonomy Research Facilities) and other scientific enquiry, and it’s important to engage the public with the processes which happen after death in order to promote environmentally friendly burial and cadaver donation to facilities such as that at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry.”

The Museum is attempting to re-engage the public with natural decay as well as educate on artificial preservation and disposal. This is the perfect opportunity to peruse its anatomical collection, consisting of over 5000 specimens, and learn how they stay preserved after 200 years.

Delicious Decay will be hosted in collaboration with Annabel de Vetten-Peterson (highly acclaimed food artist) and Dr Anna Williams (Forensic Anthropologist currently championing the use of real human remains for taphonomic research).
Delicious Decay is part of the Museum’s Autumn/Winter seminar season ‘Remains to be Seen’.

Information and Booking:

Friday 28 October – Introductory evening event split into several 15 minute talks
Carla Valentine – “Mourning Coffee: how funerary cannibalism led to death cakes, death cookies, and funeral biscuits”
Dr Anna Williams – “Nauseating or Necessary? Why we need Body Farms in the UK”
Jamie Upton – “What’s Your Poison? Death Cocktails”
Doors open 6:30pm for your free cocktail and chance to view the specimens, the event starts at 7pm and the talks end around 8pm with half an hour or so to view the specimens again. Evening ends 8:45 latest.

Saturday 29 October - Day long event 12:00 to 19:00 with one hour time slots, each costing around £9.99 for entry. This includes several decomposition experiences:

Excavating edible soil for free consumable body parts

A chance to view the second floor, normally not open to the public.

A short poster lecture with Dr Anna Williams and her ghastly chemicals used to train cadaver dogs to detect human remains.

A make-up artist who will make you look ‘decomposed’!

Scattered throughout our authentically decorated Body Farm will be tables of incredible edibles for you to purchase – either consume on site or take them to Halloween parties and scare all the guests!

Cost: £15.79

Cost: Free of Charge


Contact and Booking Details

More information at this website.

Reserve tickets at this website

Add to Calendar 28/10/2016 28/10/2016 Europe/London Delicious Decay: The Edible Body Farm (Evening) Delicious Decay will engage the public with the sometimes horrifying yet fascinating topic of bodily decomposition via very palatable means, and will be held during the run-up to Halloween on October 28th and 29th.The event is inspired in part by the unusual chemical indole, which is present in coff...

IanVisits
https://www.ianvisits.co.uk/calendar/2016/10/28/delicious-decay-the-edible-body-farm-evening-114450
St Bartholomew's Hospital Museum, Bart's Hospital, Giltspur Street, London, St Bartholomews Hospital site, London, EC1A 7BE DD/MM/YYYY

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Bart's Hospital, Giltspur Street, London, St Bartholomews Hospital site, London, EC1A 7BE

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