History - Latest news and reviews


Is it time to restore Collop Monday as an English tradition?

There is rarely any need to have an excuse to eat bacon, but the Monday before Pancake Day offers a good reason to munch on the porcine morsels - for it is Collop Monday.


1868 – the year that your socks could kill you

It's October 1868, and an article appears in a number of newspapers warning of the dangers of "Poisoned Hosiery".


Shakespeare’s Shoreditch theatre found to have extra large stage

A Shakespearean theatre stage large enough to stage fight scenes is being uncovered in Shoreditch.


Pots with Attitude – Georgian satire at the British Museum

Satire, that great British tradition of puncturing the pomposity of the great and good is the topic of a new ceramics and print display at the British Museum.


75th anniversary of the Catford school bomb

At lunchtime today, it will be 75 years to the moment when a German bomb was dropped on a South London school, killing 38 children and 6 adults.


How steam trains drove Victorians to acts of madness

The newly invented steam train, traveling so fast and far were blamed for triggering dark desires in men, driving them to insane acts of violence.


Spring-Heeled Jack – the Terror of London

It's January 1838, and London is in the midst of a terror, of a man with claws and clammy skin who leaps at people and attacks in the dark.


Southwark’s Roman sarcophagus to go on display

Last year, a rare discovery was made in Southwark, of a Roman sarcophagus -- and later this year it is to go on public display as part of a new exhibition.


Kew Gardens private underground railway

As people wander around the ornate lawns of Kew Gardens, few are aware that just under their feet is the remains of a large private railway tunnel.


Does this 17th-century map show an early image of Father Christmas?

A rare map of the Arctic Ocean held at The National Archives may contain some of the earliest colour images ever produced of Father Christmas.


Free Book – A short history of Roman London

To mark the recent opening of the London Mithraeum, a new book has been published offering a short, but quite comprehensive history of Roman London.


The time your Mince Pies contained mutton, veal and pepper

A 17th century recipe for Mince Pies that's recently been found in The National Archives calls for a loin of fat mutton to be minced with a leg of veal.


40 years of Flying the Tube to Heathrow Airport

Forty years ago, a world first occurred, as the first ever underground rail link between an airport and a city opened -- and it was in London.


Uncovering the hidden remains of Merton Priory

The largely hidden remains of an important Priory currently languishing under a 1980s dual carriageway are to be uncovered in a major restoration project.


Heathrow’s Victorian era prison cell

Long before Heathrow was runways and hotels, it offered accommodation of a very different sort - an overnight prison cell right in the centre of the village.


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