As Tower Bridge doesn’t open for boats as often during the winter months, they’re resuming their behind-the-scenes tours that include trips into the huge bascule chambers under the bridge.

The bascule chambers are where the huge counterweights for the bridge slide into when the bride opens, and are a hidden surprise under the main road bridge.

Bascule chamber (c) Tower Bridge

The tours take in the main tourist areas, but then you are taken away from the tourists to get up close to the original steam engines, accumulators and boilers in the Victorian Engine Rooms.

This tour also goes behind the scenes to the Bridge’s operational areas including the Control Cabin, Machinery Room and finally, down long flights of stairs to the immense Bascule Chambers.

The 2-hour tours cost £50 per adult, run at 10am on weekends from November to February and need to be booked in advance from here.

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2 comments
  1. Nick says:

    Seems to be £50 now, £47 concessions and £45 children

  2. David T says:

    The most eerie bit is being in the bascule chamber and hearing the engine of a coastal ship passing. Presumably the same for large barges.

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