A variant if you like of the tube map genre is a new map of the history of Brutalist architecture laid out on a diagram of the Barbican estate.

Produced by Dorothy, a UK based studio producing prints and artworks, the Brutalist map features over 150 architects, significant buildings, events and publications which were pivotal to the evolution of this architectural movement and its subsequent love/hate relationship with critics and the general public.

Ranging from Le Corbusier, to the post-war boom spearheaded by architects such as Alison and Peter Smithson and Erno Goldfinger, to more recent schemes championing brutalism such as Innsbruik Ski Jump by Zaha Hadid and The Hepworth Wakefield by David Chipperfield.

And of course, the Barbican.

This historical map of Brutalism will be available by the end of the month from the Barbican shop and can be pre-ordered here.

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One comment
  1. ChrisC says:

    The Met Breuer is no longer The Met Breuer.

    The Met Museum had a temporary lease from the Whitney Museum of American Art from around 2016 and called it that.

    It’s now the temporary home of the Frick Collection and called Frick Madison.

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