It’s often nostalgic to look back at places that have been torn asunder by major construction sites and think, goodness, it really did look like that.

Thanks to the magic of Google Street view and its archive facility – here are some then and now photos along the central section of the Crossrail project.

Abbey Wood Station

Sept 2009

April 2018

June 2012

April 2018

North Woolwich tunnel head

Sept 2009

May 2018

Connaught Tunnel

Aug 2008

May 2018

Custom House Station

Aug 2008

March 2018

May 2012

May 2018

Silvertown Station

July 2008

May 2018

Whitechapel Station

June 2008

May 2018

Liverpool Street Station

June 2012

Feb 2018

Moorgate Station

July 2008

Sept 2017

Farringdon Station

Oct 2008

Oct 2015

July 2008

March 2018

July 2008

Feb 2018

Tottenham Court Road Station

June 2008

April 2018

Oct 2008

April 2018

Paddington Station

Aug 2009

Nov 2018

All photos courtesy Google Street View.

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8 comments on “Past and present photos of Crossrail construction sites
  1. Mark Cooper says:

    Tottenham Court Road has definitely lost a lot of it’s older charm. The Crossrail project has stolen a lot of history from there. Hopefully it will get back to normal – one day?!

  2. paolo francis says:

    I can’t comprehend how or why such beautiful Victorian buildings have been demolished and replaced by sterile buildings of no character.
    Why were they not listed or preserved.
    The cross rail project is simply another bombing raid on London’s iconic architecture.
    More considerate planning should have been carried out but the powers that be seem to have tunnel vision!

    • JP says:

      Victorian architectural flim-flammery with its superfluity of over-blown decoration serving no point but to trump the craftsmanship of its progenitors puts to shame, like, the economic, modern eze-kleen glass box.
      When someone is paid to decorate such inanity, being out of practice shows, I think. We can end up with cloud art on a statement glass canopy being confused with dirty smudges and obscuring any actual fluffy white clouds that might just be passing over Paddington station, for instance.

    • John B says:

      Shame that some of those Victorian buildings couldn’t have been saved, and that the awful Centrepoint could’ve gone instead.

    • ianvisits says:

      Which is a reminder that what we loathe today will be the iconic heritage of tomorrow. You might decry the demolition of the older buildings, but tear down Centrepoint today and the next generation might live to curse you.

    • Jeremy says:

      @John B: I’d imagine demolishing Centre Point is unlikely ever to happen as the economical method of dispensing with it might have a literal impact on the station below.

  3. JP says:

    Centrepoint is an exemplar of its age and is liked and loathed in equal measure to, say, the former Pan Am building (now MetLife) in New York whose midwife was Walter Gropius, no less. They are statements of their age’s intent and without them, history would be the poorer.
    Eventually some of the two or three hundred skyscrapers foisted on London in this day and age will achieve similar recognition and be saved. Then we can rejoice in tearing down the inane majority; glass, steel, concrete, 3D printed polymers et al.

  4. The central London sequence is rather misleading. Yes some of the impact at TCR is shown at the eastern end (though focusing on the Astoria and ignoring the swathe of C19 buildings lost on the opposite sde), but remember the western entrance has obliterated the best part of a city block near Dean St

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