This rather modern looking sculpture is actually a memorial, or celebration if you prefer, unveiled on the 300th anniversary of the death of the composer, Henry Purcell.

Called the “Flowering of the English Baroque” it was unveiled by HRH the Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowden, on the tercentenary of the death of the composer, 22 November 1995.

A small bronze plaque in the floor confirms the basic details, and the work was created by the sculptor Glynn Williams, which depicts the forms of music erupting from the composer’s mind.

What’s not stated is the reason for its location — as Purcell was born just down the road and also went to the local Westminster School and worked at the Abbey, so he is very much a local chap.

Henry Purcell was an English composer. Although incorporating Italian and French stylistic elements into his compositions, Purcell’s legacy was a uniquely English form of Baroque music. He is generally considered to be one of the greatest English composers.

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One comment
  1. E says:

    Thanks for this! I know well (and dislike) the statue, but had no idea that he was a local lad.

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