22 photos of the new Thameslink Train

This is what Thameslink passengers will be riding in from sometime in 2016 as the first of the new trains arrive.

A mock-up of one which is essentially real, except that it has no wheels was put on display today for a few hours to have a look. And a set of wheels put on display next to it.

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New Bogies

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Shiny new train

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Discover the sign says, so I did.

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Joints between carriages

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First class passengers get plug sockets for their laptops

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All the buttons, or gauges, or something

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Inside the drivers cab!

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Not the usual view a driver will see when driving the train

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First class seating area

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SOS emergency by the wheelchair area

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Fully walk through trains

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Toilets

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Embark here if you have two, or four wheels

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Glossy white train

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Entry — notice the double upright rails to hold on to

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Close buttons

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Floating seating

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Lots of handholds on the seats for standing passengers

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You can never have too many warning signs

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Small ball joint to support the floating seats

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Turn right

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Digital displays with digital adverts

 

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Whats's on in London: today or tomorrow or this weekend

11 comments on “22 photos of the new Thameslink Train
  1. dave_in_chiswick says:

    Looks nice, but strange that it has the coupling always exposed – I was under the impression they were of fixed length and would never be operated in multiple.

    • Lloyd Collins says:

      The couplings are there more as a method of recovering the train should it break down, or for shunting operations in depots etc.

  2. Long Branch Mike says:

    Check out the stacked speakers at the end of the windshield in the driver’s cab!

  3. Edwin Chappell says:

    They need a coupling on each end ready for when they break down and need rescuing! Also, that does not look like much legroom; did you try the seats for comfort Ian?

  4. Dave says:

    “Joints between carriages”
    They’re “gangway connections” (or what the toy-trainset brigade call “corridor connections”).

  5. Gerry says:

    Looks like it has all the problems of modern trains. Cramped, uncomfortable, far too few seats, you have to disturb someone (or be disturbed) when accessing / exiting seats, etc.

    Worst of all, there’s nothing to lean against when you have to stand; as usual, they’ve thoughtfully designed the seats’ grab handles so that they jab you in the back.

  6. Neil Nerva says:

    What about drop down small tables in standard class airline seating?
    Can’t cost that much to fit

  7. Jimmy says:

    Do the floating seats have pneumatic suspension? That’s going to feel quite different to being solidly attached to the floor, no?

    • Eric says:

      It looks similar to the longitudal seating on the Metropolitan line’s S8 rolling stock and that feels no different to seats attached to the floor

  8. Paul says:

    The “buttons, or gauges, or something” are safety system isolation switches. :-)

  9. Mike says:

    “Platform exits are located to your right” – what a mouthful! Why not just the word “Exit”, with an arrow?

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