Art and architecture tours of Portcullis House

Not sure how long they have been doing these, as I haven’t seen it before, but it turns out that there now are twice monthly tours of the new Parliament Building, Portcullis House.

To be fair, I don’t look at the required pages on the Parliament website that often to notice changes – will add it to my tracking software.

Built on top of the new Westminster tube station, this is very much a building you either like or loathe, and while the cost was controversial (how much for those trees?) it has been designed to last a lot longer than most office buildings tend to now a days.

I’ve been in a few times for talks, and it is open during London Open House weekend for browsing and personally, I think it is quite a nice building with some very professional looking “Boardrooms” for the Committee Meetings.

Portcullis House is the home of the House of Commons contemporary portrait collection. This unique collection of art records leading Parliamentarians in paintings, works on paper and photographs. The collection reflects a diversity of styles and approaches by leading UK based artists working over the last 50 years. All the works were commissioned or acquired by the Works of Art Committee.

The guided tours take about 75 minutes and include a visit to the first floor Committee Corridor of Portcullis House.

The next dates for the tours are: 20 & 24 June, 18 & 22 July and the tours take place at 9.45am & 11.30am

Prices

  • Adult: £15
  • Concessions: £10 (Students, Senior citizens (60+), Members of the Armed Forces)
  • Groups (10+): £10

Pre booked tickets are available to buy online through ticketmaster or by phoning 0844 847 1672.

You can also visit its more famous Gothic neighbour across the road – which is now open every Saturday for tours, as well as the busier Summer Recess tours.

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2 Comments

  1. Online through ticketmaster? Gosh, has our parliament finally reached the 20th century? (and I do mean 20th)

  2. The building looks ok. The trees look better than the greenery that recently sprouted from the paving cracks at St Pauls.

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