Oh dear, a time for a fisking of a press release:

According to the statement:

over half of the those working in the UK’s creative industries, a staggering 52% of the 1000 people surveyed, have never had an idea for an invention!

Considering that the “creative industries”, includes music, painters, digital designers, writers etc – why would you expect them to have ideas for inventions? Actually, that nearly half of them have had ideas for inventions sounds quite good, doesn’t it?

Anyhow:

55% of men who responded to the survey stated having had an idea for an invention at some point in the last 10 years compared to just 41% of female respondents

Presuming that the survey is professionally weighted to allow for a reasonable 50:50 split on the gender – over a ten year period, nearly half (48%) of respondents have had an idea for an invention – which I would say is actually quite good.

Yet of those of who responded to say they had come up with a potential invention, 67% reported having not developed it beyond that initial idea

An IMHO surprisingly high 15% of the 1,000 respondents also tried to do something with an idea.

In total fewer than 10% of those who stated having actually had an idea for an invention reported successfully developing it into a product

Of the 1,000 respondents, something like 4.8% were able to not only have an idea but also successfully turned it into a product.

Or to put it another way, a third of people who tried to do something with their idea, actually succeeded. In any industry, turning a third of new ideas into actual products would be cause for regular champagne parties.

For a survey to find that 4.8% of the surveyed people can have an idea and also turn it into a commercial product is to my mind surprisingly good.

Look around your workplace and ask yourself how many of the people you have worked with over the past ten years have left to set up their own business. Unless you work in industries that spawn start-ups as a routine part of their business, I bet it is far lower than 1 in 20 people.

A press release that should have championed the UK’s outstanding success in coming up with ideas and turning them into commercial products actually tries to spin a message of doom and gloom.

The press release is supposed to be promoting events to encourage more people getting involved in turning their ideas into products – which is a good thing – but which message is more likely to get you thinking about attending a seminar?

  • Look at how high the success rate is. Jump in, the water’s lovely.
  • Oh noes, no one ever succeeds, it’s too difficult.

I know which one would have me excitedly clicking web links to book tickets at their events.

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